Thursday, 15 December 2011

A strong 6.3 magnitude earthquake erupted on the ocean floor south of the Kermadec Islands

December 15, 2011 – KERMADEC – A strong 6.3 magnitude earthquake erupted on the ocean floor south of the Kermadec Islands at 1010 GMT on Thursday. The earthquake struck at a depth of 34.1 km (21 miles) but is not expected to be strong enough to generate a tsunami threat. The 6.3 magnitude earthquake was preceded by a 5.6 magnitude foreshock. The Kermadec earthquake is the 5th major earthquake to strike the planet in just four days and it comes as an omen of still more potential planetary seismic unrest. We first saw signs of mounting seismic tension across the planet on December 4th after a successive string of moderate tremors rattled tectonic plates across the globe. In subsequent days, a cadre of stress eruptive earthquakes have struck along the planet’s island arcs. Before today’s Kermadec earthquake, for example, the Island Arcs of South Sandwich Islands, Kuril, the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, Sumatra along the Java Trench, and the Antilles region of the Puerto Rico Trench were all hit by tremors. Similarly, after the 6.3 Kermadec earthquake, 5.3 and 5.6 magnitude earthquakes which struck the Izu Islands along the arc of the Izu-Ogasawara Trench of Japan. Stay tuned; this turbulence may be far from over. 

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